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Growth and Development




Bright Futures Patient Handout: 7 and 8 Year Visits

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School

Doing Well at School

  • Try your best at school. Doing well in school is important to how you feel about yourself.

  • Ask for help when you need it.

  • Join clubs and teams you like.

  • Tell kids who pick on you or try to hurt you to stop it. Then walk away.

  • Tell adults you trust about bullies.

Safety

Playing It Safe

  • Don't open the door to anyone you don't know.

  • Have friends over only when your parents say it's OK.

  • Wear your helmet for biking, skating, and skateboarding.

  • Ask a grown-up for help if you are scared or worried.

  • It is OK to ask to go home and be with your Mom or Dad.

  • Keep your private parts, the parts of your body covered by a bathing suit, covered.

  • Tell your parent or another grown-up right away if an older child or grown-up shows you their private parts, asks you to show them yours, or touches your private parts.

  • Always sit in your booster seat and ride in the back seat of the car.

Nutrition and Physical Activity

Eating Well, Being Active

  • Eat breakfast every day.

  • Aim for eating 5 fruits and vegetables every day.

  • Only drink 1 cup of 100% fruit juice a day.

  • Limit high-fat foods and drinks such as candies, snacks, fast food, and soft drinks.

  • Eat healthful snacks like fruit, cheese, and yogurt.

  • Eating healthy is important to help you do well in school and sports.

  • Eat with your family often.

  • Drink at least 2 cups of milk daily.

  • Match every 30 minutes of TV or computer time with 30 minutes of active play.

Oral Health

Healthy Teeth

  • Brush your teeth at least twice each day, morning and night.

  • Floss your teeth every day.

  • Wear your mouth guard when playing sports.

Development and Mental Health

Handling Feelings

  • Talk about feeling mad or sad with someone s who listens well.

  • Talk about your worries. It helps.

  • Ask your parent or other trusted adult about = changes in your body.

  • Even embarrassing questions are important. It's OK to talk about your body and how it's changing.

© 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics